Exploring Agatha Christie’s Greenway

Greenway National Trust

In 1938, Agatha Christie and her second husband, the archaeologist Max Mallowan, bought their beloved holiday home, Greenway, in South Devon. Surrounded by woodland, and with views over the River Dart, the house was described by Christie as ‘the loveliest place in the world.’ While Christie seldom wrote at Greenway, she edited her manuscripts here, […]

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The Chained Library at Hereford Cathedral

Chained Library Hereford Cathedral

Giving off serious Hogwarts vibes, Hereford Cathedral’s Chained Library is the largest of its kind in the world. Home to 1,500 texts, including 229 medieval manuscripts, the Chained Library is a surviving example of a once popular security system in European libraries. During the Medieval and Early Modern period, books were seen as valuable commodities, […]

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Exploring Shakespeare’s Stratford-upon-Avon

Gardens Shakespeare's Birthplace, Stratford-upon-Avon

The birthplace of William Shakespeare, the market town of Stratford-upon-Avon is steeped in history and culture: half-timbered buildings line the streets and medieval churches sit next to the River Avon. Baptised on 26 April 1564, Shakespeare spent much of his early life in the town. Here, he was introduced to the works of classical writers […]

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Treasures of the Austrian National Library

State Hall Austrian National Library

It’s easy to see why the Austrian National Library in Vienna is regarded as one of the world’s most beautiful libraries.Inside the central State Hall, frescoed ceilings soar above walnut bookcases, and marble columns frame the room. Home to more than 12.5 million books and artefacts, the Library’s history stretches back over 650 years. Its […]

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Lady Mary Wroth and the literary world of Penshurst Place

Penshurst Place

From its enchanting state rooms to its landscaped grounds, Penshurst Place is steeped in literary history. Located in the idyllic Weald of Kent, this 800-year-old estate was home to one of the Jacobean era’s most prolific – and overlooked – women writers. Born in 1587, Lady Mary Wroth came from a talented literary family. Literary […]

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Rare Botanical Books and Manuscripts

Medical Botany, William Woodville (1790)

Just a stone’s throw away from the hustle and bustle of London Victoria is the Royal Horticultural Society’s Lindley Library, an elaborate red-brick building with a rich intellectual heritage. Specialising in botanical art and garden history, the Lindley Library is a horticultural lover’s paradise, and contains a fascinating array of early printed books on gardening, […]

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Menander and The Woman from Messene

View of ancient Messene

The comedian Menander (342-490 BC), remains one of ancient Greece’s most influential playwrights. He was the leading representative of New Comedy, a theatrical form that originated in Athens. Plays of this kind focused on the struggles of everyday life, from issues concerning marriage, to money. Despite writing over one hundred plays during his lifetime, only […]

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